I learned at least two important things [in May], while advocating for good clean energy policy on Capitol Hill with E2. 
 
Lesson one: Both sides of the aisle are confounded by the Trump administration, often as surprised and shocked as the rest of us at the erratic moves of the executive branch, and not always pleased.
 
This was a somewhat heartening realization, a reminder that intelligent legislators don't all blindly fall in line with harmful policy initiatives. Our group of Colorado-based E2 members met with progressives and conservatives, from Colorado and numerous other states, and we found common ground with them all. Job creation, job security, economic growth, a stable tax base, a clean environment – these were some of the impacts of the policies for which we were advocating, and legislators understood. We connected with the people with whom we met – some better than others, of course – and we listened to each other's stories. Even when liberal Boulderites found themselves posing with a gun in one congressman's office, we came away with the sense that we'd had real, meaningful and found shared values. We came away with some interesting photos, too.
 
Lesson two: I do not have what it takes to advocate in heels. The endorphins of a successful day were matched only by the relief of finally changing my shoes.
 
As one of E2's new Emerging Leaders, I'm energized by this valuable experience – exercising my rights as a citizen, representing my profession as an environmental entrepreneur, and standing shoulder to shoulder with other industry professionals, with one voice. 
 
In these tense and troubling times for our nation, it felt like a great day for the democratic process. Just a bad day for heels.
 
Photo by Ning Mosberger-Tang: Team Rox in DC (from left to right)- E2 Advocate Susan Nedell, and E2 members Ning Mosberger-Ting, Chris Bentley, Christi Turner and Michael Rucker.