Top 5 Counties: Allegheny, Philadelphia, Montgomery, Chester, Bucks

  • Pennsylvania ranks 11th among all 50 states in clean energy jobs
  • Construction accounts for 42% of Pennsylvania’s energy efficiency jobs
  • All 67 counties in Pennsylvania have residents working in clean energy

HARRISBURG AND PHILADELPHIA, PA – (June 19, 2018) – More than 86,000 Pennsylvanians now work in clean energy in every county in the state, according to a new analysis of energy jobs data by the national nonpartisan business group E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs) and partner organizations -Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance (KEEA), Sustainable Business Network of Philadelphia, Green Building Alliance and Sustainable Pittsburgh.

Overall clean energy jobs grew slightly to 86,285, up from 84,511, with energy efficiency leading the way with more than 65,000 jobs – powering Pennsylvania to rank just outside the top 10 states in total clean energy jobs. Renewable energy, led by wind and solar, combined for an additional 8,700 jobs.

Clean Jobs Pennsylvania is available at www.e2.org/reports/cleanjobspa2018.

“Clean jobs count in Pennsylvania.” said Sharon Pillar, E2’s Pennsylvania consultant. “This sector has only just begun, illustrating the enormous chance for communities in our state to grow a 21st century workforce that spans all levels of education and training – if our leaders seize the opportunity.”

Although home to more than 17,000 solar installations and several large wind farms, Pennsylvania remains behind other neighboring states in getting electricity from renewable energy (only about 5 percent currently).  Recent policy victories, including the solar border bill (Act 40) that will help keep Pennsylvania’s solar market strong, are helping to move the state in the right direction but more will need to be done to keep the state’s clean energy economy expanding.

“Pennsylvania presents the ideal environment for growing the clean energy manufacturing sector with its well established supply chains and first-in class fabrication and distribution workforce. There was no better place than Pennsylvania to locate my business,” said Hanan Fishman, president, Alencon Systems.

According to the Clean Jobs Pennsylvania report, nearly 12,000 clean energy jobs can be found in the state’s rural areas while Pittsburgh and Philadelphia metro areas account for more than half of Pennsylvania’s clean energy jobs. Allegheny led all counties in Pennsylvania with nearly 12,000 jobs, followed by Philadelphia and Montgomery counties with nearly 9,000 each. Chester and Bucks counties each have nearly 5,000 jobs. All 67 Pennsylvania counties have residents working in clean energy.

Energy efficiency remains the largest clean energy sector in Pennsylvania with 65,288 workers – accounting for about 3 percent all energy efficiency jobs in America. 42 percent of these jobs (36,455) were in the construction industry. Nationally, one out of every six construction jobs are in energy efficiency.

“Year after year, energy efficiency jobs in Pennsylvania continue to rise, putting Pennsylvanians to work in local jobs that cannot be outsourced,” said Matt Elliott, Executive Director of the Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance.  “Across the Commonwealth, energy efficiency is helping residents and businesses save energy and save money while growing the local workforce.”

The report is part of E2’s recently launched Clean Jobs Count campaign designed to raise awareness of the economic benefits of clean energy in America.

The jobs analysis expands on data from the 2018 U.S. Energy and Employment Report (USEER) released in May by the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) and Energy Futures Initiative (EFI).  E2 is a partner on the USEER, the third installment of the energy survey first released by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2016 but canceled last year by the Trump administration.

To speak with E2 members and other business leaders in your area, please contact Michael Timberlake at (202) 289-2407.

*E2’s 2018 Pennsylvania Clean Jobs report uses a different methodology than previous year’s reports. Prior analysis focused only on clean energy jobs while this year’s report, based on the national US Energy and Employment Report (USEER), uses a comprehensive methodology that focuses on all energy sector jobs. For additional questions on the changes in methodology and how that impact the report’s job findings, visit our FAQ or contact Michael Timberlake (michael@e2.org).

More information about E2’s clean energy jobs research can be found at www.e2.org/reports.

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Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) is a national, nonpartisan group of business leaders, investors, and professionals from every sector of the economy who advocate for smart policies that are good for the economy and good for the environment. Our members have founded or funded more than 2,500 companies, created more than 600,000 jobs, and manage more than $100 billion in venture and private equity capital. For more information, see www.e2.org or follow us on Twitter at @e2org.

About Partner Organizations:

Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance (KEEA) – The Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance (KEEA) is a non-profit, tax-exempt 501(c)(6), corporation dedicated to promoting the energy, efficiency and renewable energy industries in Pennsylvania.

Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia – Sustainable Pittsburgh affects decision-making in the Pittsburgh region to integrate economic prosperity, social equity, and environmental quality as the enduring accountability, bringing sustainable solutions for communities and businesses.

Green Building Alliance (GBA) – Green Building Alliance (GBA) advances innovation in the built environment by empowering people to create environmentally, economically, and socially vibrant places.

Sustainable Pittsburgh – Sustainable Pittsburgh affects decision-making in the Pittsburgh region to integrate economic prosperity, social equity, and environmental quality as the enduring accountability, bringing sustainable solutions for communities and businesses.